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Oyster Eggs

BCUK

Oyster eggs are approximately 40-50 microns in size; they are soft and very nutritious being high in protein and omega 3 fatty acids.
Size is a very important consideration when feeding corals. Oyster Eggs are from ½ to 1/3rd the size of a rotifer and approximately 1/8th the size of an Artemia nauplii.


Corals for which this food is particularly useful are those with poor prey capture responses and those with very small polyps. Included are Porites, Montipora, Goniopora, Gorgonians and soft corals. Oyster eggs even show success with the maintenance of previously difficult or impossible to maintain azooxanthellate soft corals and seafans.

  • Frozen Oyster Eggs are available in 50g baby cube blister packs.
  • This food is Gamma Irradiated to ensure it is pathogen free.


Feeding Recommendations

We recommend that you place the frozen cubes in a beaker of aquarium water and allow them to thaw prior to feeding; this will create a suspension of the eggs that can then be poured into the aquarium. Frozen oyster eggs can be dispersed into the water column to feed most small mouthed stony corals, sea fans, gorgonians and soft corals that feed on small particle food. Target feeding with a pipette is also effective to feed specific corals.


To ensure the complete uptake of the oyster eggs, we recommend turning off the protein skimmer for at least an hour when feeding. Protein skimmers will remove oyster eggs and therefore waste at least some of this food. One suggestion is to have your skimmer set up on a timer to be off for several hours when feeding.


Two cubes will feed a highly populated 40 gallon (182 litre) aquarium. This amount may be taken as an incremental dose of two cubes per 40 gallons or more. Hobbyists must use their own judgment in calculating an amount per feeding for their aquarium. Greater amounts can be fed with additional benefit without nutrient issues, especially once the skimmer is turned back on.


Night time is the best time to feed, as corals are feeding on small particles at night when zooplankton is normally raising up into the water column. To take advantage of this natural cycle, oyster eggs can be fed after the lights are turned off. Alternatively, some corals are active by day and night, and they can be fed at any time.


Target feeding is best for Goniopora corals, a recommended method of feeding this species is:

  1. Cut the bottom off of a plastic bottle and use it to isolate the area around the Goniopora while feeding. Remember to clean the bottle by rinsing with clean water, do not use soap or any other cleaning solution.
  2. Mix a very small amount of oyster eggs in the aquarium water to make a suspension and feed through the top of the bottle. This will concentrate the food around the targeted coral and protect it from fish that may pick at and damage the coral while trying to get at the food. Remove the bottle after the coral has had time to feed.
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Oyster eggs are approximately 40-50 microns in size; they are soft and very nutritious being high in protein and omega 3 fatty acids.Size is a very important consideration when feeding corals. Oyster Eggs are from ½ to 1/3rd the size of a rotifer and approximately 1/8th the size of an Artemia nauplii. Corals for which… Read More
Protein: 7%
Fibre: < 0.2%
Fat: 2.49%
Ash: 2%
Moisture (Approx.): 80 %
EPA: 14.8 % of total fat
DHA: 9.64 % of total fat
Phosphorus: 7%
  • Frozen
  • Marine
Find stockist

Oyster eggs are approximately 40-50 microns in size; they are soft and very nutritious being high in protein and omega 3 fatty acids.
Size is a very important consideration when feeding corals. Oyster Eggs are from ½ to 1/3rd the size of a rotifer and approximately 1/8th the size of an Artemia nauplii.


Corals for which this food is particularly useful are those with poor prey capture responses and those with very small polyps. Included are Porites, Montipora, Goniopora, Gorgonians and soft corals. Oyster eggs even show success with the maintenance of previously difficult or impossible to maintain azooxanthellate soft corals and seafans.

  • Frozen Oyster Eggs are available in 50g baby cube blister packs.
  • This food is Gamma Irradiated to ensure it is pathogen free.


Feeding Recommendations

We recommend that you place the frozen cubes in a beaker of aquarium water and allow them to thaw prior to feeding; this will create a suspension of the eggs that can then be poured into the aquarium. Frozen oyster eggs can be dispersed into the water column to feed most small mouthed stony corals, sea fans, gorgonians and soft corals that feed on small particle food. Target feeding with a pipette is also effective to feed specific corals.


To ensure the complete uptake of the oyster eggs, we recommend turning off the protein skimmer for at least an hour when feeding. Protein skimmers will remove oyster eggs and therefore waste at least some of this food. One suggestion is to have your skimmer set up on a timer to be off for several hours when feeding.


Two cubes will feed a highly populated 40 gallon (182 litre) aquarium. This amount may be taken as an incremental dose of two cubes per 40 gallons or more. Hobbyists must use their own judgment in calculating an amount per feeding for their aquarium. Greater amounts can be fed with additional benefit without nutrient issues, especially once the skimmer is turned back on.


Night time is the best time to feed, as corals are feeding on small particles at night when zooplankton is normally raising up into the water column. To take advantage of this natural cycle, oyster eggs can be fed after the lights are turned off. Alternatively, some corals are active by day and night, and they can be fed at any time.


Target feeding is best for Goniopora corals, a recommended method of feeding this species is:

  1. Cut the bottom off of a plastic bottle and use it to isolate the area around the Goniopora while feeding. Remember to clean the bottle by rinsing with clean water, do not use soap or any other cleaning solution.
  2. Mix a very small amount of oyster eggs in the aquarium water to make a suspension and feed through the top of the bottle. This will concentrate the food around the targeted coral and protect it from fish that may pick at and damage the coral while trying to get at the food. Remove the bottle after the coral has had time to feed.